Dwelling Machine Prototypes

Old Man River City Prototype (stadium shaped)

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Brainstorming on Buckyworks: The Anthology

  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1 The Esthetics of Architecture
  • Chapter 2 Designing from the Inside Out
  • Chapter 3 A Dome in the Desert (a report from the field)
  • Chapter 4 Towards the Solar-Hydrogen Village
  • Chapter 5 Home Schooling in the Global Classroom
  • Chapter 6 Of Comfort Zones and Fuzzy Logic
  • Chapter 7 Untitled
  • Chapter 8 The User Interface [draft copy available for peer review]
  • Chapter 9 Globally Positioning your Home Sweet Home
  • Appendix (downloadable resources, web links and contacts)

This was a book proposal I put out after J. Baldwin’s BuckyWorks was successfully published by John Wiley & Sons. Applewhite was skeptical that it’d fly as an anthology. He was right.

Garden of Eden Prototypes

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In BuckyWorks (© 1996 John Wiley & Sons), author J. Baldwin recounts his work with the Pillowdome (pg. 168-ff). His leak-proof prototype uses a frame made from recycled aluminium water pipe (from the Starnet International Corporation) and argon gas filled pillows made of Dupont’s fluoropolymer resin, Tefzel® (chemically similar to Teflon®).

Since Tefzel® allows full-spectrum sunlight to penetrate the dome’s interior, living and gardening areas may be creatively integrated.

Excessive humidity and overheating within these “Garden of Eden” prototypes remains a challenge however — Jay points to the Climatron in the Missouri Botanical Garden as a good approximation of what he’d like to achieve as an affordable living space option — but affordability would entail greater energy efficiency. He speculates that the “chilling machine” effect, a result of airflow patterns arising in some dome designs, might help keep the interior comfortable (e.g. see Fig 8-8, page 160).

For more info on the PillowDome, see:

Online reviews of J. Baldwin’s BuckyWorks:

Since Tefzel® allows full-spectrum sunlight to penetrate the dome’s interior, living and gardening areas may be creatively integrated.

Excessive humidity and overheating within these “Garden of Eden” prototypes remains a challenge however — Jay points to the Climatron in the Missouri Botanical Garden as a good approximation of what he’d like to achieve as an affordable living space option — but affordability would entail greater energy efficiency. He speculates that the “chilling machine” effect, a result of airflow patterns arising in some dome designs, might help keep the interior comfortable (e.g. see Fig 8-8, page 160).

For more info on the PillowDome, see:

Online reviews of J. Baldwin’s BuckyWorks:


Category: synergetics